Faculty of Linguistics, Cultural Studies and Art: Research Data

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  • Research Data
    Al-Mudhaybi Regional Survey: Field photos of the structures
    2023-09
    Edelmann, Pascal (DataCollector)
    Hofmann, Andreas (DataCollector)
    Hochrieser, Stefanie (DataCollector)
    Möbius, Merle (DataCollector)
    Maiorano, Maria Pia (DataCollector)
    Biezeveld, Irini (DataCollector)
    Billor, Beriwan (DataCollector)
    Grün, Fabian (DataCollector)
    Kluge, Jonas (DataCollector)
    Koch, Katharina (DataCollector)
    Mez, Nathalie (DataCollector)
    Schneider, Tamara (DataCollector)
    Zöchling, Antje (DataCollector)
    Juhas, Marcel (DataCollector)
    Özcelik, Taylan (DataCollector)
    Puerta-Schardt, Juan-Marco (DataCollector)
    Schweizer, Moyra (DataCollector)
    Schmidt, Conrad (DataCollector)
    Göbel, Jonas (DataCollector)
    Budzyn, Adrian (DataCollector)
    Werner, Jannis (DataCollector)
    Öztürk, Mahsa (DataCollector)
    Greven, Sofia (DataCollector)
    The Al-Mudhaybi Regional Survey was initiated to gain insights into settlement patterns, their development, and the causes of significant social changes in Central Oman, particularly during the 3rd millennium BCE. This was achieved through a combination of survey methods (remote sensing based on satellite imagery with ground-truthing and intensive systematic surveys in north-south transects) as well as small-scale excavations. The results challenged the previous notion of traditional settlement hierarchies and a predominantly sedentary, agriculture-based society in Central Oman, especially during the Early Bronze Age (Umm an-Nar period). In-stead, a complex network of temporary sites emerged, utilized at various times and for different activities. Another significant finding is that the interior of Oman was more heavily frequented during the Neolithic period than previously believed. Additionally, contrary to prior assumptions, the Middle Bronze Age (Wadi Suq period) does not represent a period of decline and shares similarities in its development with the northern regions of the Omani Peninsula. These findings can contribute to raising awareness of the diversity of human lifestyles overall, particularly highlighting the cultural achievements of mobile communities.
      63  42
  • Research Data
    MDH_Structures
    2023-09
    Edelmann, Pascal (DataCollector)
    Hofmann, Andreas (DataCollector)
    Hochrieser, Stefanie (DataCollector)
    Möbius, Merle (DataCollector)
    Maiorano, Maria Pia (DataCollector)
    Biezeveld, Irini (DataCollector)
    Billor, Beriwan (DataCollector)
    Grün, Fabian (DataCollector)
    Kluge, Jonas (DataCollector)
    Koch, Katharina (DataCollector)
    Mez, Natalie (DataCollector)
    Schneider, Tamara (DataCollector)
    Zöchling, Antje (DataCollector)
    Juhas, Marcel (DataCollector)
    Özcelik, Taylan (DataCollector)
    Puerta-Schardt, Juan-Marco (DataCollector)
    Schweizer, Moyra (DataCollector)
    Schmidt, Conrad (DataCollector)
    Göbel, Jonas (DataCollector)
    Budzyn, Adrian (DataCollector)
    Werner, Jannis (DataCollector)
    Öztürk, Mahsa (DataCollector)
    Greven, Sofia (DataCollector)
    The Al-Mudhaybi Regional Survey was initiated to gain insights into settlement patterns, their development, and the causes of significant social changes in Central Oman, particularly during the 3rd millennium BCE. This was achieved through a combination of survey methods (remote sensing based on satellite imagery with ground-truthing and intensive systematic surveys in north-south transects) as well as small-scale excavations. The results challenged the previous notion of traditional settlement hierarchies and a predominantly sedentary, agriculture-based society in Central Oman, especially during the Early Bronze Age (Umm an-Nar period). In-stead, a complex network of temporary sites emerged, utilized at various times and for different activities. Another significant finding is that the interior of Oman was more heavily frequented during the Neolithic period than previously believed. Additionally, contrary to prior assumptions, the Middle Bronze Age (Wadi Suq period) does not represent a period of decline and shares similarities in its development with the northern regions of the Omani Peninsula. These findings can contribute to raising awareness of the diversity of human lifestyles overall, particularly highlighting the cultural achievements of mobile communities.
      34  2
  • Research Data
    MDH_SmallFindPhotos
    2023-09
    Edelmann, Pascal (DataCollector)
    Hofmann, Andreas (DataCollector)
    Hochrieser, Stefanie (DataCollector)
    Möbius, Merle (DataCollector)
    Biezeveld, Irini (DataCollector)
    Grün, Fabian (DataCollector)
    Kluge, Jonas (DataCollector)
    Koch, Katharina (DataCollector)
    Mez, Nathalie (DataCollector)
    Maiorano, Maria Pia (DataCollector)
    Schneider, Tamara (DataCollector)
    Zöchling, Antje (DataCollector)
    Juhas, Marcel (DataCollector)
    Özcelik, Taylan (DataCollector)
    Puerta Schardt, Juan-Marco (DataCollector)
    Schweizer, Moyra (DataCollector)
    Göbel, Jonas (DataCollector)
    Budzyn, Adrian (DataCollector)
    Werner, Jannis (DataCollector)
    Öztürk, Mahsa (DataCollector)
    Greven, Sofia (DataCollector)
    Schmidt, Conrad (DataCollector)
    The Al-Mudhaybi Regional Survey was initiated to gain insights into settlement patterns, their development, and the causes of significant social changes in Central Oman, particularly during the 3rd millennium BCE. This was achieved through a combination of survey methods (remote sensing based on satellite imagery with ground-truthing and intensive systematic surveys in north-south transects) as well as small-scale excavations. The results challenged the previous notion of traditional settlement hierarchies and a predominantly sedentary, agriculture-based society in Central Oman, especially during the Early Bronze Age (Umm an-Nar period). In-stead, a complex network of temporary sites emerged, utilized at various times and for different activities. Another significant finding is that the interior of Oman was more heavily frequented during the Neolithic period than previously believed. Additionally, contrary to prior assumptions, the Middle Bronze Age (Wadi Suq period) does not represent a period of decline and shares similarities in its development with the northern regions of the Omani Peninsula. These findings can contribute to raising awareness of the diversity of human lifestyles overall, particularly highlighting the cultural achievements of mobile communities.
      21  2
  • Research Data
    MDH_SmallFinds
    2023-10
    Kluge, Jonas (DataCollector)
    Edelmann, Pascal (DataCollector)
    Hofmann, Andreas (DataCollector)
    Hochrieser, Stefanie (DataCollector)
    Möbius, Merle (DataCollector)
    Maiorano, Maria Pia (DataCollector)
    Biezeveld, Irini (DataCollector)
    Billor, Beriwan (DataCollector)
    Grün, Fabian (DataCollector)
    Mez, Natalie (DataCollector)
    Schweizer, Moyra (DataCollector)
    Schmidt, Conrad (DataCollector)
    Budzyn, Adrian (DataCollector)
    Werner, Jannis (DataCollector)
    Göbel, Jonas (DataCollector)
    Öztürk, Mahsa (DataCollector)
    Greven, Sofia (DataCollector)
    The Al-Mudhaybi Regional Survey was initiated to gain insights into settlement patterns, their development, and the causes of significant social changes in Central Oman, particularly during the 3rd millennium BCE. This was achieved through a combination of survey methods (remote sensing based on satellite imagery with ground-truthing and intensive systematic surveys in north-south transects) as well as small-scale excavations. The results challenged the previous notion of traditional settlement hierarchies and a predominantly sedentary, agriculture-based society in Central Oman, especially during the Early Bronze Age (Umm an-Nar period). In-stead, a complex network of temporary sites emerged, utilized at various times and for different activities. Another significant finding is that the interior of Oman was more heavily frequented during the Neolithic period than previously believed. Additionally, contrary to prior assumptions, the Middle Bronze Age (Wadi Suq period) does not represent a period of decline and shares similarities in its development with the northern regions of the Omani Peninsula. These findings can contribute to raising awareness of the diversity of human lifestyles overall, particularly highlighting the cultural achievements of mobile communities.
      21  1